Diploma in Botanical Illustration at the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh

This is now completed - yeay, I am now a Dip BI. I managed to achieve a distinction and received the Eve Bennett award for Botanical Illustration, I will update the work here so come back to see more in a few months. I want to thank the RBGE for all of their support and family and friends who have helped me through this, thank you guys!

 

We've had some lovely coverage of this exhibition from the Botanical Art and Artists Blog, a big thankyou to Katherine Tyrrell for including our RBGE graduate show.

first year second year

Arisaema consanguineum pseudostem and nodding peduncle  - watercolour 2015
Arisaema consanguineum infructescence - watercolour 2015
Arisaema consanguineum infructescence - watercolour 2015


Arisaema ringens infructescence - watercolour 2015
Arisaema ringens infructescence and infloresence - watercolour 2016
Arisaema ringens infructescence and infloresence - watercolour 2016

Arisaema serratum infructescence - watercolour 2015
Arisaema serratum infloresence - watercolour 2016
Arisaema serratum infructescence and infloresence - watercolour 2016

Arisaema costatum shoot - pen and ink 2016
Arisaema ringens shoot - pen and ink 2016
Arisaema serratum shoot - pen and ink 2016

 
Arisaema intermedium ink - pen and ink 2016
 

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Diploma in Botanical Illustration - SECOND YEAR 2015/2017

This session we are working towards producing 5 painting in a botanical theme.

Arisaema are fascinating, I have seen these amazing looking plants on the Jacques Armand stall over the years at Gardening Scotland but never had a reason to commit to buying them, when last year I was looking for a theme and realised I now had a legitimate reason! Glee! I was initially attracted to the inflorescences which were the basis of my selection to show a variety in shape and colour, as I get to know these plants however; I find that everything about them is absorbing. On making the decision to work with them I bought various tubers and was delighted to find them all unique, I planted them and then had the joy of unfurling shoots and new leaves. I have documented these aspects in my folders*. Leaf shape, became a new area of investigation followed by inflorescences, and then I was so excited to see the form and colour of each infructescence, what a discovery. The work completed on the morphology and cultivation has broadened my appreciation and fascination for these plants.

A very brief resume on the genus – Arisaema belong to the Arum family, subfamily Aroideae, genus Arisaema. Identifying Arisaema has been a work of many botanists over almost 200 years, there are over 150 species. Arisaema are fairly well spread around the world. It’s easier to distinguish that they do not originate in Europe, South America or Australia. They tend towards growing in cool or damp forested and or mountainous regions.

One of the most distinguishing features for the layman is the inflorescence made up of a spathe and spadix. Arisaema have interesting gender variability. Their gender is dependent on the strength of the plant with respect to age and nutrition. Young and/or weak plants tend to be male, strong plants with good nutrition will allow a plant to become female or bisexual. Arisaema have uses as food and in traditional and modern medicines, however due to a calcium oxalate crystals which are a strong irritant the plant must be specially treated before use. Please don’t eat the Arisaema!

If you are interested in a commissioning a painting or drawing please contact me.


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